Christ and Pop Culture

Both movies this week involve a measure of mayhem, but the two directors' personal approaches to their stories couldn't be more different. First up is Antoine Fuqua's sequel The Equalizer 2, in which Denzel Washington reprises his role as an efficient assassin who just wants to make the world better through violence. Second is Hirokazu Kore-eda's The Third Murder, at last making its stateside appearance. Kore-eda's view of his film's titular murder tends more toward the meditative and ambiguous. Does this departure for the Japanese auteur pay off?

Music interlude by Wayne John Bradley, "Rain." Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

Theme music by Alexander Osborn and Lindsey Mysse. Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

Direct download: Seeing_and_Believing_162.mp3
Category:seeingbelieving -- posted at: 8:01am EST

Wade and Kevin get lost in the woods for their first film this week: Leave No Trace, Debra Granik's long-awaited follow-up to Winter's Bone. Is this story about a father raising his daughter off the grid in the Pacific Northwest a worthy successor? Then things take a turn for the weird as the guys jump into Boots Riley satire of capitalism and racism run amok, Sorry to Bother You.

Music interlude by tokyolite, "Cycle." Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

Theme music by Alexander Osborn and Lindsey Mysse. Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

Direct download: Seeing_and_Believing_161.mp3
Category:seeingbelieving -- posted at: 8:19am EST

The guys review a very big movie about a very tiny pair of heroes this week with the Marvel offering for July, Ant-Man and the Wasp. Does the first MCU movie post-Infinity War do enough differently to keep it from feeling like business as usual? Also on the docket is another unusual story: a documentary about a set of triplets, separated at birth, who come to find one another later in life. Hijinks may or may not ensue.

Music interlude by YNCK, "The World Is Yours." Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

Theme music by Alexander Osborn and Lindsey Mysse. Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

Direct download: Seeing_and_Believing_160.mp3
Category:seeingbelieving -- posted at: 8:43pm EST

Fifteen years ago, Pixar introduced us to The Incredibles—a family just like any other… except they also had superpowers. The 2004 animated film made this super-family relatable, with sibling squabbles, work frustrations, and miscommunication. And this year, the long-awaited sequel gave us another look inside this relatively normal family with abnormal skills.

In this ounce of Persuasion fast chat, Erin Straza and Hannah Anderson chat about some of the key storylines from the two films. The conversation is practically spoiler-free, focusing more so on the way this story affirms and values the unique role of the individual while inspiring the individual to be part of the team. Listen in, then continue the conversation on Twitter @PersuasionCAPC or in the CAPC members-only community on Facebook.

Direct download: Persuasion_142.mp3
Category:persuasion -- posted at: 11:00pm EST

The release of Sicario: Day of the Soldado, the sequel to Denis Villeneuve's acclaimed 2015 thriller about the U.S.-Mexico drug war, has the guys thinking about the gateway drugs that got them into movies in the first place. They pair their review of Stefano Sollima's sequel with a discussion about the films, people, and things that drew them into cinephilia. Some of the answers might not surprise you; some might. Tune in to find out!

Music interlude by Sunshine & Irony, "Rain on Seneca Rock." Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

Theme music by Alexander Osborn and Lindsey Mysse. Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

Direct download: Seeing_and_Believing_159.mp3
Category:seeingbelieving -- posted at: 10:51pm EST

Last week the news outlets were all abuzz with the announcement of Justice Kennedy’s retirement from the Supreme Court. Speculation now abounds: who will be nominated for this prestigious appointment? The potential names are circulating and commentary is mounting about each potential nominee. One who hasn’t been considered yet is our very own Hannah Anderson, who would like nothing more than to don a black robe and give opinions for a living.

In this ounce of Persuasion fast chat, Erin Straza and Hannah Anderson discuss dream jobs that, like being appointed to the Supreme Court, have zero requirements. For Hannah, it’s being a justice; for Erin, it’s being a food critic. These hopes and dreams speak of how we are wired and the joys we find in exercising our gifts to make the world a better place, whether that’s by interpreting the law or praising good food. Listen in, then continue the conversation on Twitter @PersuasionCAPC or in the CAPC members-only community on Facebook.

More to Read from Persuasion Episode 141:

How Trump’s Supreme Court Pick Could Undo Kennedy’s LegacyThe New Yorker

Qualifications To Become A Supreme Court JusticeThe Law Dictionary

Award-winning food critic Jay Rayner sends this letter to everyone who asks how to get his jobBusiness Insider

Did you enjoy this episode of Persuasion? Give these a listen:

Persuasion 126: Lottery Dreams & Nightmares

Persuasion 123: Entrepreneurs, Freelancers, and Those Who Love Them with Dorcas Cheng-Tozun

Persuasion 97: Home Work and Productivity

Theme music by Maiden Name.

Direct download: Persuasion_141.mp3
Category:persuasion -- posted at: 9:36pm EST

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