Christ and Pop Culture

Remember 1993? It was a simpler time, when cloned dinosaurs were still a novelty and Steven Spielberg's Jurassic Park ruled the box office. In the present day, J.A. Bayona throws his hat into the dinos-eating-people ring with Jurassic Park: Fallen Kingdom. Wade and Kevin decide to investigate whether it's a worthy successor to its ancestors. Then they decide to spend some time with some smooth criminals in the star-studded Ocean's 8, in which Sandra Bullock leads a squad of thieves in - what else? - a daring heist.

Music interlude by Bandage, "Norden."

Used under Creative Commons license 3.0. Theme music by Alexander Osborn and Lindsey Mysse. Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

Direct download: Seeing_and_Believing_158.mp3
Category:seeingbelieving -- posted at: 8:57am EST

Remember 1993? It was a simpler time, when cloned dinosaurs were still a novelty and Steven Spielberg's Jurassic Park ruled the box office. In the present day, J.A. Bayona throws his hat into the dinos-eating-people ring with Jurassic Park: Fallen Kingdom. Wade and Kevin decide to investigate whether it's a worthy successor to its ancestors. Then they decide to spend some time with some smooth criminals in the star-studded Ocean's 8, in which Sandra Bullock leads a squad of thieves in - what else? - a daring heist.

Music interlude by Bandage, "Norden."

Used under Creative Commons license 3.0. Theme music by Alexander Osborn and Lindsey Mysse. Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

Direct download: Seeing_and_Believing_158.mp3
Category:seeingbelieving -- posted at: 8:56am EST

Unless you’ve shut off the news and all social media this past month, you are aware of our president’s policy that has separated children from parents as families cross our southern border. Regardless of your stance on the morality and legality of the practice, one thing is for certain: the blame game has taken over our discourse. Those who support the president’s policy blame previous administrations for the law that forces the trauma upon these immigrants, and they feel sorry for the way President Trump is being vilified. Those who don’t support the policy blame those who voted for President Trump, and they are outraged by the human rights violations. All this blaming, however, is distracting us from the main concern: the children who have been separated from their parents and the parents who are frantic to be reunited with them.

In this episode of Persuasion, Erin Straza and Hannah Anderson discuss the way our public discourse has become about winning and sides rather than solving a crisis that is traumatizing real families and real children. Is it possible for us to set politics aside? Is it possible to embrace empathy for families that see this dangerous way as the only option open to them? Is it possible to solve the humanitarian crisis first and fix blame later? All these questions and more are covered. Listen in, then continue the conversation on Twitter @PersuasionCAPC or in the CAPC members-only community on Facebook.

Direct download: 140_Persuasion_140_The_Blame_Game_in_Separating_Families.mp3
Category:persuasion -- posted at: 6:54pm EST

The guys tackle two family-friendly flicks on this week's episode, as they review Brad Bird's fourteen-years-in-the-making sequel to Pixar's superhero smash The Incredibles. Was the wait worth it to see the Parrs back in tights? A fond return to Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood is on the itinerary as well. Everybody likes Mr. Rogers, but will everybody like the new documentary about him? Slip into your sneakers and pastel cardigan as Wade and Kevin discuss Won't You Be My Neighbor?

This episode is brought to you by Plot Devices, creators of the Storyclock Notebook! Use the Storyclock Notebook to turn your ideas into stories and make the writing process less terrible. Learn more at plotdevices.co and get 20% off your first order with the code BELIEVE20.

Music interlude by Jesse Warren, "Miles Above You." Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

Theme music by Alexander Osbornand Lindsey Mysse. Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

Direct download: Seing_and_Believing_157.mp3
Category:seeingbelieving -- posted at: 1:06am EST

In response to a marketing ploy by IHOP, Twitter has decided: Pancakes and burgers do not go together. Last week the International House of Pancakes restaurant chain launched a new campaign to promote its burger menu. There were cryptic pre-launch ads showing the letter P in the logo flipped upside down to make it a B, all in an attempt to stir up interest in what the B might mean. All of Twitter seemed shocked to find the B was for burger, because, if you had not noticed, IHOP is about breakfast. Could this new campaign convince us to choose IHOP for any other reason? If we judge the effectiveness of the campaign based on the Twitter response, the answer would be a hearty no.

In this ounce of Persuasion fast chat, Erin Straza and Hannah Anderson assess this failed online communication to a previous conversation discuss the need for better online engagement. Too often we send out messages like IHOP did: without knowing our audience well enough to shape the message to be properly understood and embraced. There is much we can learn from IHOP’s recent marketing ploy. Listen in, then continue the conversation on Twitter @PersuasionCAPC or in the CAPC members-only community on Facebook.

Direct download: 139_Persuasion_139_Why_Twitter_Cares_about_IHOP_s_IHOb_Campaign.mp3
Category:persuasion -- posted at: 12:40am EST

Spiritual warfare can take many forms, as shown by the two films on this week's episode. First up is Wade and Kevin's most anticipated film of the summer, First Reformed, Paul Schrader's distinctive study of a Reformed minister fighting against despair as he tries to do the right thing. Then the guys detour into another genre with A24's latest foray into horror: Ari Aster's Hereditary, a harrowing look at a family beset by all sorts of darkness from within and without.

This episode is brought to you by Plot Devices, creators of the Storyclock Notebook! Use the Storyclock Notebook to turn your ideas into stories and make the writing process less terrible. Learn more at plotdevices.co and get 20% off your first order with the code BELIEVE20.

Music interlude by Rue Royale, "What Next Dear One." Used under Creative Commons license 3.0. Theme music by Alexander Osborn and Lindsey Mysse. Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

Direct download: Seeing_and_Believing_156.mp3
Category:seeingbelieving -- posted at: 11:05pm EST

What makes cults so boundlessly attractive to cult followers and so immediately unnerving for the rest of us? That's just one of the questions raised by Netflix's new documentary miniseries Wild Wild Country, which tries to get to the bottom of a 1980s dispute between a religious commune and the Oregon community next door. Also on deck this week is the Nick Offerman-starring Hearts Beat Loud, a feel-good indie movie about a dad trying to get the band back together with his college-bound daughter.

Music interlude by Fantasy Crisis, "College." Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

Theme music by Alexander Osborn and Lindsey Mysse. Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

Direct download: Seeing_and_Believing_155.mp3
Category:seeingbelieving -- posted at: 10:41pm EST

Free speech is a right that’s often claimed in emotionally charged conversations. We want to say whatever we want, because it’s a right granted to us by our county’s constitution. This is technically true: our country extends freedom for people to speak their minds. Although 100% agreement on what is said isn’t likely, we value the right to say what we think, ultimately trusting society to corral outlying ideas and shape them into a more refined understanding along the way. But what happens when the ideals of the majority begin to squeeze out fringe thoughts in ways that makes the society unhealthy?

In this episode of Persuasion, Erin Straza and Hannah Anderson discuss several recent free speech kerfuffles covered in the news and online, including recent comments by Rosanne Barr and Samantha Bee and the NFL’s anthem ruling. All these happenings cause alarm and force us to consider if our value of free speech may presume too much in terms of society’s collective ability to handle its power and goodness. When are dissenting opinions and voices needed? Should abrasive or abusive words be shut down? Who decides what constitutes improper ideals in need of correction? Listen in to all this and more, and then continue the conversation on Twitter @PersuasionCAPC or in the CAPC members-only community on Facebook.

Direct download: 138_Persuasion_138_You_Cant_Say_That.mp3
Category:persuasion -- posted at: 9:02pm EST

The guys take it down a notch after the blockbusters of last week. First they review American Animals, director Bart Layton's follow-up to The Impostor. Does Layton's trademark gamesmanship around the boundary between reality and recreation pay off in his film based on a true story centered around a heist by college students? Wade and Kevin then turn to a zombie apocalypse, Australia-style, with their review of the Martin Freeman-starring Netflix film Cargo.

Music interlude by John Milwee, "Del Rio." Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

This episode is brought to you by Plot Devices: creators of the Storyclock Notebook. Use the Storyclock Notebook to turn your ideas into stories and make the writing process less terrible. Learn more at plotdevices.co and get 20% off your first order with the code BELIEVE20.

Theme music by Alexander Osborn and Lindsey Mysse. Used under Creative Commons license 3.0.

Direct download: Seeing_and_Believing_154.mp3
Category:seeingbelieving -- posted at: 11:28pm EST

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